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Chardonnay: Apples And Honey In A Wine

Every year, as Rosh Hashanah approaches, I look for special wines to serve at my holiday table. I used to select big, full-bodied, red wines; however in recent years I’ve found that after a long morning in a stuffy synagogue, a chilled, refreshing, white wine, really hits the spot. On special occasions such as Rosh Hashanah, one good choice of white wine is almost always the deservedly popular Chardonnay.

11 Wines To Try This Rosh Hashanah

It’s that time of year again: the Jewish month of Elul. The end of summer, the start of fall, and the approaching holidays mark a time of transition. This is traditionally a time of reflection in which we are encouraged to contemplate our decisions and, more importantly, our mistakes. I am, of course, talking about wine — choosing the most appropriate wine for the moment remains an enduring value. Rosh Hashanah is not only a time for introspection, but also for some increased formal dining, and a chance to try some new wines with friends and family.

Apple Pie Kugel

(The Nosher/JTA)

Apple Pie Kugel

(The Nosher/JTA) – One day, many years ago – during the High Holidays yet — I called my mother early in the morning to yell at her about kugel. Really. In my family kugel meant skinny noodles mixed with eggs, schmaltz, salt and fried onions. I’d heard of the sweet kind from friends who rhapsodized about the ones their grandmas made. But I’d never tasted any of those, because my mother told me they were horrible.

Apple Rosettes

Apple Rosettes

Tomato Basil Challah

Tomato Basil Challah. Courtesy of Veronica Sage McAvoy/The Countryman Press

Tomato Basil Challah

I am always looking for ways to infuse some Italian ness into my Jewish cooking, and a tomato basil challah is an obvious choice and a delicious pairing. The tomato paste adds both a beautiful red hue and a touch of sweetness to the dough. You can substitute with puréed sun dried tomatoes or sun dried tomato paste if you prefer.

Meet Shannon Sarna, ‘Modern Jewish Baker’

Courtesy of Veronica Sage McAvoy/The Countryman Press

Shannon Sarna, 35, of South Orange has baked new life into old standards, and she’s got me believing in the power of resurrection when it comes to Jewish carbohydrates.

Harissa and Goat Cheese Rugelach

Harissa and Goat Cheese Rugelach. Courtesy of Veronica Sage McAvoy/The Countryman Press

Harissa and Goat Cheese Rugelach

Harissa is a classic North African pepper condiment with a pesto like consistency that spreads easily. Although it is not difficult to make a homemade version of harissa, it has become pretty easy to find at the supermarket (different brands vary in spiciness; try a few to see what you like). Topped with creamy goat cheese to balance the heat, this rugelach is a perfect match between Ashkenazi pastries and Middle Eastern flavors.

Pumpkin Chocolate Hazelnut Rugelach

Pumpkin Chocolate Hazelnut Rugelach. Courtesy of Veronica Sage McAvoy/The Countryman Press

Pumpkin Chocolate Hazelnut Rugelach

People often scoff at the combination of pumpkin and chocolate, but the flavors complement one another wonderfully. After all, pumpkin is a pretty neutral flavor— what most people consider “pumpkin” can be more accurately called pumpkin pie spice. The color of this rugelach is just stunning and the flavor features a sweetness that is just a tad different for your next tea party, brunch, or just because.

S’mores Babka

S'mores Babka. Courtesy of Veronica Sage McAvoy/The Countryman Press

S’mores Babka

It has been said that I will try to “smorify” anything, and it’s true— I love the simple, classic American flavors of sweet chocolate, gooey marshmallow, and crunchy graham crackers. The filling of this babka is a celebration in sweetness and texture, no campfire necessary.

Spicy Pizza Rugelach

Spicy Pizza Rugelach. Courtesy JTA

Spicy Pizza Rugelach

New York (JTA) The first thing that will strike you about this spicy pizza rugelach is the beautiful color. And then when you set your teeth into them, it’s like taking that first bite of a great New York slice topped with a sprinkle of red pepper flakes.